Community, social, and economic resiliency for safer neighborhoods

This solution addresses lack of resiliency in New York City, USA for local communities

Problem Description

New Yorkers come together during emergencies to support each other and begin the recovery process. And while significant disruptive events like Hurricane Sandy affect all New Yorkers, they ultimately expose and exacerbate underlying vulnerabilities in many communities. Across every corner of the city, everyday New Yorkers, along with local institutions, energize the recovery process and voluntarily help their neighbors without waiting for official assistance. In short, these residents, organizations, and community leaders anchor neighborhood recovery, and continue to provide support long after official resources are no longer available. Unquestionably, official resources are vital for community preparedness. One of the most critical components to disaster preparedness and response is effective communication between government and community stakeholders.

Building Blocks

Story

The strengthening of social networks and planning within a community are also critical to enhancing resiliency. This can entail building relationships with, and checking in on, neighbors and the availability of adequate neighborhood gathering and resource centers. How New Yorkers interact with one another can be an important factor in guarding against many risks. Heat, for example, presents a unique challenge to New York City. As we learned during the Chicago heat wave of 1995, neighborhoods with more robust social infrastructure, such as community centers, safe streets, and schools had better health outcomes than those without. And as mean annual temperatures in New York City are projected to increase by 4.1° to 5.7°F by the 2050s, neighborhoods without social networks and infrastructure are at an even greater risk, particularly where heat-vulnerable populations, such as children and seniors, are increasing.

Resources

Organisations Involved

Solution Stage

One of the 7 stages of an innovation. Learn more
STAGE SPECIALIST SKILLS REQUIRED EXAMPLE ACTIVITIES RISK LEVEL AND HANDLING FINANCE REQUIRED KINDS OF EVIDENCE GENERATED GOAL
Developing and testing3
Mix of design and implementation skills
  • Rapid prototyping
  • Service, product and process design
  • Co-design
  • User-design
  • Light-touch evaluation
  • Cost-benefit modelling
  • Randomised control trials
  • High failure rate should be an explicit expectation
  • Visible senior leadership essential
HIGH
  • Grants, convertible grants/loans
MEDIUM
A stronger case with cost and benefit projections developed through practical trials and experiments, involving potential users
Demonstration that the idea works, or evidence to support a reworking of the idea

Key Details

Activity